The Lodge is located on Route 22 in White Plains near the White Plains/Scarsdale border.   Our address is

279 Maple Avenue at Antonio Meucci Place
White Plains, NY 10606.

 

EAST 287

Take 287 East, exit 8W.  Make a left on Bloomingdale Road.   Make right on Maple Avenue.   Proceed 11 traffic lights. Lodge is on the left, at the corner of Maple Avenue and Summit Avenue.


WEST 287

Take 287 West to Westchester Avenue exit.   Make a left on Bloomingdale Road.   Make right on Maple Avenue.  Proceed 11 traffic lights.   Lodge on left, corner of Maple Avenue and Summit Avenue.


WHITESTONE BRIDGE

Take Hutchinson Parkway North to Exit 23N (White Plains).   Make a right on Mamaroneck Avenue and go 3.2 miles (15 traffic lights) to Maple Avenue.   Make a left of Maple Avenue and proceed 0.6 mile (6 traffic lights).   Lodge on left, corner of Maple Avenue and Summit Avenue.


THROGS NECK BRIDGE

Take New England Thruway (95N).   Take Hutchinson Parkway North Exit and then follow Whitestone Bridge directions.


BRONX RIVER PARKWAY

Take Bronx River Parkway North to Exit 21 (Main St.) and make a right turn on Main Street.  Maker right on South Lexington Avenue (2nd traffic Light) and proceed 0.5 miles (5th traffic light).  Make right onto Maple Avenue.   Lodge on left, corner of Maple Avenue and Summit Avenue.


GEORGE WASHINGTON & TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE

Take Major Deegan Expressway North (87N).   After Toll, take Exit 8 to 287 East.  Take Exit 8W (Bloomingdale Road) and make left on Bloomingdale Road and a right on Maple Avenue.   Proceed 11 traffic lights.   Lodge on left, corner of Maple Avenue and Summit Avenue.


TAPPAN ZEE BRIDGE

From 87 South take Exit 8 to 287 East and follow George Washington & Triborough Bridge directions.


PARKING

Parking is available behind the Lodge and along the left side of Summit Avenue.  Parking is also available on other side of Summit Avenue (The Chase Bank parking lot).



In August 1870, Meucci reportedly obtained transmission of articulated human voice at the distance of a mile by using a copper plait as a conductor, insulated by cotton.  He called this device “telettrofono.”